What are the issues relating to prison population?

What are the issues relating to prison population?

The Justice Committee holds its third evidence session as part of its inquiry into Prison Population 2022: planning for the future.

The purpose of this session is to examine the current and future pressures on the prison system from a strategic and operational perspective, including

  • the impact of prison population growth on running prisons in the context of constricted finances
  • how prisons respond to and seek to rehabilitate the current prison population, including particular cohorts of prisoner and how they plan for and accommodate changes in the population
  • the current and future position on maintaining and modernising the prison estate
  • issues relating to the recruitment and training of prison officers and leaders

For the full article and for more information please visit the Parliment UK website here.

Call for evidence launched into social care funding in England

Call for evidence launched into social care funding in England

The Economic Affairs Committee, chaired by the Rt. Hon. the Lord Forsyth of Drumlean, launches its inquiry into the social care system in England and invites written contributions to its investigation. The deadline for submissions is 9 October 2018.

The Committee will be focusing on the funding challenges faced by the social care system in England. They are seeking to assess the effectiveness of different funding models, the shortfalls in delivery and make recommendations on how future social care demands can be met in England.

The Committee is seeking evidence to address and or all of the following questions:

  • What are the funding challenges for social care in England, and how can they be overcome?
  • Why have successive governments been reluctant to address challenges in the delivery of social care?
  • How can a sustainable funding model for social care supported by a  diverse and stable market be created?
  • How can the cost of the provision of social care be fairly distributed?
  • What lessons can be learnt from elsewhere in the United Kingdom, or from other countries, in how they approach social care?

To read the full article and for more information please visit the Parliment UK website here.

My Guide – The Hidden Service of Guide Dogs

My Guide – The Hidden Service of Guide Dogs

My Guide is a service offered by Guide Dogs where a fully trained volunteer is matched with an adult with sight loss.  The volunteer can assist the visually impaired person to build confidence or access services or places which would be difficult, stressful or even impossible to access without sighted support.  The service is free and open to anyone who feels their sight loss is affecting their confidence to get out and about.

The Hull Mobility team currently have 34 partnerships across the Hull, East Riding and Lincolnshire areas.  The volunteers are helping people to attend the gym, go swimming, access shops and cafes and attend events, the list is endless.  The team are currently focused on recruiting volunteers in Hull who can give a few hours once a week or fortnight who can make a real difference to the lives of people living with sight loss

If you would like to know more about volunteering for My Guide go to the Guide Dogs website or drop Wendy Smith an email wendy.smith@guidedogs.org.uk and have a chat about it

 

Connect Well Social Prescribing Grant Round 4: Healthy Diet and Active Lives

Connect Well Social Prescribing Grant Round 4: Healthy Diet and Active Lives

Deadline 9am 5th November

Round 4 of the Connect Well social prescribing grants seeks to fund projects that support people in eating healthily and in raising their activity levels. Projects will be funded that reach those who face the greatest barriers to making healthy choices, and that adopt where appropriate, tiered approaches to suit the capacity of those with mobility and other restrictions.

The panel does not wish to support projects that focus wholly on weight loss or weight management, but rather wants to support projects that focus on healthy diet and increasing physical activity.

Eligible projects must work to achieve any or all of the following outcomes:

  • Promote a healthy diet and increased physical activity to those at risk of the impact of poor diet and inactivity, e.g. through education; information; access to healthy foods and activities, to enable them make manageable and sustainable changes.
  • Tackles the barriers to a healthy diet and increased physical activity faced by those most at risk of the impact of poor diet and inactivity, e.g. environmental and social pressures leading to poor diet choices and inactivity; lack of social or peer support for positive change; physical and emotional restrictions to increasing activity; cultural and language barriers to understanding; lack of access to healthy choices.
  • Motivates and engages those who are least active in achieving the PHE recommendation of 3 times 10 minutes of continuous brisk walking a day.

You can download the Guidelines and application form below

Social Prescribing Grants guidance notes

Application form Social Prescribing grants Round 4

Deadline for applications is 9am Monday 5th November 2018. Applications received after this time and date will not be accepted.

A briefing and networking session for this round will be held at the Legend’s Lounge, KCom Craven Park, Preston Road, HU9 5HE on Wednesday 9th October 2018 from 1.30pm – 4pm.

Please contact Jane Thompson on 01482 499035 or e-mail Jane.Thompson@nbforum.org.uk if you would like to attend.

Plans shelved for joint registration portal for Charity Commission and HMRC

Plans shelved for joint registration portal for Charity Commission and HMRC

From Civil Society

The government has abandoned a project to create a joint portal for HMRC and the Charity Commission that would mean charities would only have to register once with both institutions.  At the moment charities with income over £5,000 have to register with the Commission and again with HMRC to be able to claim Gift Aid and other tax relief.  Plans for joint registration were announced in 2013 but have already been delayed a number of times.  In minute 15 of their most recent meeting with charity representatives recently HMRC confirmed that plans for the portal would “no longer be taken forward”.

For more information go to the Civil Society website

A Quiet Crisis: Local Government Spending on Disadvantage

A Quiet Crisis: Local Government Spending on Disadvantage

New research shows councils are struggling to provide services for rising numbers of people facing disadvantage, with the most deprived areas hit hardest. Faced with increasing demands for help, cash-strapped councils are having to cut funding on the preventive measures that stop problems such as homelessness or having to take children into care in the first place.

A Quiet Crisis: Local Government Spending on Disadvantage, by the New Policy Institute (NPI) for Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales looks at official data on local government spending in England on a range of services for disadvantaged adults and children facing disadvantage. The research shows that 97% of total cuts in spending on disadvantage have fallen on the fifth most deprived councils despite them also having higher numbers of people in need. Due to reduced central government funding these deprived councils (typically northern metropolitan authorities) have had to cut spending by 5% or £278m since 2011/12, whereas the least deprived areas (mostly southern county councils) have been able to maintain or even increase spending on services for people facing disadvantage in the last five years.

To read the full press release go to Lloyds Bank Foundation

To read a summary of the report as an online pdf click here

To read the full report as an online pdf click here

The 'So what, what next?' project

The ‘So what, what next?’ project

The So What, What Next? project was designed by the Transforming Care empowerment steering group to look at ways of supporting people with a learning disability or autism who have recently been discharged from hospital to explore their skills and passions and to find ways to contribute these to their local communities.

The focus was on supporting people to use their strengths, become active citizens and to grow their independence.

You can read the project report here as an easy read pdf

You can read ‘top tips’ for professionals and supporters as an online pdf here

Playing Out – a report from the Children’s Commissioner

Playing Out – a report from the Children’s Commissioner

The Children’s Commissioner for England has published a report looking at the importance to children of play and physical activity.

The benefits of play and physical activity to children are undeniable. Yet the proportion of children being active is extremely low. In 2015, just 1 in 4 (23%) boys and 1 in 5 (20%) girls aged 5-15 met the CMO’s recommendation of 60 minutes of activity each day.

Children who don’t get the opportunity to play and to be active may be putting their social, emotional, intellectual and physical development at risk. The impact on mental health is particularly concerning given that children’s mental health is reaching crisis point: it is the most frequently raised issue with the Children’s Commissioner’s Office and one in 10 children have a mental health disorder.

The Commissioner’s Office asked children how they spend their time outside school and during the school holidays.

The responses to these questions are contained in this online pdf

New study finds 4.5 million UK children living in poverty

New study finds 4.5 million UK children living in poverty

From The Guardian

More than 14 million people, including 4.5 million children, are living below the breadline, with more than half trapped in poverty for years, according to a new measure aimed at providing the most sophisticated analysis yet of material disadvantage in the UK.

The measure seeks to forge a fresh political consensus between left and right over how to define and track poverty, with the aim of encouraging better-targeted poverty interventions, and making it easier to hold politicians to account.

It finds poverty is especially prevalent in families with at least one disabled person, single-parent families, and households where no one works or that are dependent for income on irregular or zero-hours jobs.

It was developed by the Social Metrics Commission (SMC), an independent body bringing together poverty specialists from across the political spectrum to devise a successor to the child poverty targets abolished as an official measure in 2015.

To read the rest of the article go to the Guardian

Charity Inquiry: double defaulter charities between April 2017 – March 2018

Charity Inquiry: double defaulter charities between April 2017 – March 2018

Are you compliant?

Trustees of registered charities with an annual income of £25,000 or over are under a legal duty to submit annual reports, accounts and returns (the ‘annual documents’) to the Charity Commission (‘the Commission’).

Even if the registered charity’s annual income is under £25,000 trustees are under a legal duty to prepare annual accounts and reports and should be able to provide these on request.

All charities with an income over £10,000 must submit an annual return to the Commission.

There is public interest in the issue of charities’ non-submission of annual documents, particularly where the non-compliance is over a long period of time. As a result, on 20 September 2013, the Commission opened a statutory class inquiry (‘the inquiry’) into charities that were in default of their statutory obligations to meet reporting requirements by failing to file their annual documents for two or more years in the last five years and met certain criteria

For more information go to the Government website