Infection theory could explain cause of common childhood leukaemia, says scientist

Infection theory could explain cause of common childhood leukaemia, says scientist

What causes cancer? If we know this then we can try to find ways to prevent it.

That’s why a review published on 21st May is important. It looks at all the evidence around a type of cancer called childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), using evidence from published studies to try and pinpoint a cause.

And the scientist behind the review, Professor Mel Greaves, an expert in childhood leukaemia at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has presented his theory, based on 30 years of work on the topic.

It’s important to say that the review only looked at childhood ALL. Because different types of cancer have different causes, these results won’t be the same for other forms of the disease.

For more information and commentary from Cancer Research UK go to their website

Learning Disability Week

Learning Disability Week

This year, Learning Disability Week (18 – 24 June) will be all about health – with a big focus on the Treat me well campaign.

This year’s campaign from Mencap aims to transform how the NHS treats people with a learning disability in hospital.

Mencap want to use Learning Disability Week 2018 to spread the word about the problems people with a learning disability can face in getting good healthcare in hospital, and how we can all change this.

They want to involve NHS staff in the Treat me well campaign – giving them the chance to hear from people with a learning disability and to think about the simple changes they can make which would make a big difference to people with a learning disability.

For more information about the campaign go here

Mencap have also produced a social media pack, which you can find here

Dementia Action Week

Dementia Action Week

Humber Teaching NHS Foundation Trust is marking Dementia Action Week by urging people in Hull, East Riding and North Yorkshire to help improve the lives of people living with the brain diseases.

In the UK, one person develops a form of dementia every three minutes, yet too many of them are left to face the conditions alone, leaving them feeling excluded from their communities and wider society.

In a bid to tackle this problem, the Trust is marking Dementia Action Week, which runs until Sunday (27th May), by calling on people to create a ‘dementia-friendly’ Hull, East Riding and North Yorkshire by supporting research and making one or more of the following Alzheimer’s Society pledges:

  • I will be there for carers and loved ones;
  • I will talk to people;
  • I will make time to listen;
  • I will carry on inviting people out;
  • I will be patient;
  • I will ask questions and learn about dementia;
  • I will ask if someone needs help if they look confused.

Trust Patient Research Ambassador Wendy Mitchell, who has lived with dementia for four years, underlined the call for action in a speech at the organisation’s recent research and development conference, later saying: “Let’s stop talking and start doing.”

The ex-NHS nurse, author of the best-selling memoir Somebody I used to know, said “simple acts of kindness could reduce the fear of living with dementia”.

Ms Mitchell said she helped herself by taking part in research – her “passion” – adding: “Dementia strips away so much and participation helps give back that sense of being useful and valued again.”

During Dementia Action Week, the Trust will join forces with its partners to highlight dementia and its Memory Clinic will mark the initiative by staging a 1940s-themed party.

For further information about Dementia Action Week events and dementia services, visit the Trust’s new dementia webpage

Patient’s Choice Award 2018

Patient’s Choice Award 2018

Help celebrate the efforts of local NHS staff by putting them forward for a special award.

Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust is seeking nominations from patients and their loved ones to celebrate the achievements of dedicated and compassionate staff.

The Trust covers hospitals in Scunthorpe, Grimsby and Goole and community services in North Lincolnshire which includes district nurses, podiatrists and the community dental team.

If you’ve had a good experience and want to thank an individual staff member or even a whole team of professionals then nominate them for the Patient’s Choice Award 2018.

The winner will be revealed in November at the Trust’s annual staff awards event, Our Stars 2018.

18 awards will be presented on the night to staff, volunteers and charity fundraisers, but the most coveted award on the night is the one chosen by patients and the public.

The NHS as a whole has had a very difficult winter and staff have gone above and beyond, time and time again, to provide exceptional care for the patients.

What better way to say thank you than nominating them for this prestigious award.

So whether it was someone clinical who provided you with compassionate care or another member of the Health Tree team who contributed to making your visit a positive one, they want to hear from you.

Last year’s winner was Miss Jenny Smith, consultant breast surgeon at Grimsby hospital who was recognised for giving outstanding care to her patients.

If you have been a patient or visitor at Scunthorpe, Grimsby or Goole hospitals or at one of the Trust’s community health services, you can nominate a staff member, clinical or non-clinical, in one of the following ways:

Please ensure you provide your name, contact number, the name of the staff member you are nominating, the area they work in and the reason for the nomination.

Nominations will be accepted from now up until Friday 6 July.

The winner of the Patient’s Choice award, and 17 other awards, will be revealed at the Our Stars 2018 event at the Baths Hall on Friday 2 November.

Rural housing for an ageing population: preserving independence

Rural housing for an ageing population: preserving independence

This inquiry established by the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Housing and Care for Older People has concluded that older people’s housing is neglected in rural areas. It makes a number of ‘rural proofing’ recommendations to increase the quality, supply and range of more appropriate age-friendly housing.

You can read the briefing as an online pdf here

Funding supported housing for all

Funding supported housing for all

Specialised supported housing for people with a learning disability

This report from Mencap estimates that the specialised supported housing (SSH) sector is more than double the size of previous estimates and that demand for SSH is rising. The research also finds that living independently with support in the community has a positive impact on wellbeing for people with a learning disability. SSH is a housing alternative for people with complex needs who might otherwise have lived in residential care, or NHS provisions such as ‘secure’ accommodation.

You can read the report as an online pdf here

Health warning for employers: supporting older workers with health conditions

Health warning for employers: supporting older workers with health conditions

This report from the Centre for Ageing Better argues that employers are not properly supporting older workers experiencing long-term physical and mental health conditions. Health is the most important factor affecting older workers’ decisions to stop working before reaching state pension age. This research demonstrates that early access to support, small adjustments to the workplace and working patterns, and empathetic management are crucial to enabling people to manage their health at work and remain in employment.

You can read the report as an online pdf here

The Learning Disabilities Mortality Review: annual report 2017

The Learning Disabilities Mortality Review: annual report 2017

The Learning Disabilities Mortality Review was established to support local areas to review the deaths of people with learning disabilities and improve services.

This annual report summarises the learning and recommendation from 103 reviews of deaths of people with learning disabilities during 2017.

You can find out more and download the report from the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership website here

Creative and cultural activities and wellbeing in later life

Creative and cultural activities and wellbeing in later life

This report from Age UK outlines the importance of participating in creative and cultural activities to maintain wellbeing as we get older. The research identifies the key factors that enable participation and enjoyment of cultural activities and those that present barriers to participation.

You can read the report as an online pdf here

The hardest hit: Addressing the crisis in alcohol treatment services   

The hardest hit: Addressing the crisis in alcohol treatment services   

This report from Alcohol Concern highlights how severe funding cuts, rapid re-tendering cycles, loss of qualified staff and lack of political support are impacting on some of the most vulnerable people in society.  To address the issue the report sets out key recommendations on the government developing a national strategy with treatment at the heart of a broader suite of interventions; the government must plug the gap in treatment funding and reduce inequalities and there must be a nation review of balance of staffing and expertise at each point in the system.

You can read the report as an online pdf here